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metazensae:

letsgetkinki:

On Sunday I saw cherry blossoms for the first time. Overwhelmed by their beauty - and the realization that I am truly living my longtime dream of teaching in Japan - I was moved to tears. I’ve never been so happy, y’all.

Oh My God, Brooke. I hate you. JUST KIDDING I LOVE YOU AND THIS IS SO FANTASTIC. Like, this is just a picture, but I don’t even believe it.

I can’t even imagine being surrounded by such beauty!!!!

It’s incredible. And this was on a cloudy day! 

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Like fiery eyeball thing, no problem. But don’t even try to imagine a Samoan elf. (x)

I absolutely adore everything that has spawned from Tolkien’s creations - especially The Lord of the Rings books and movies. However, this has always really bothered me about the films. Efforts were made to introduce strong female characters into the film adaptations rectifying the gender imbalance a bit, but there are no people of color. This is a huge injustice. 

However, I did notice that in the new Hobbit film, The Desolation of Smaug, there are people of color among the throng that gathers in Lake Town. This is a step up, though they were only represented in the background. 

(via hoorayitsjanae)

aljazeeraamerica:

In Louisiana, an environmental lawsuit brings hope for a new chapter

Louisiana is being slowly devoured by water. Hardly anyone disputes that. But beyond a shared sense of creeping panic, there’s little common ground in the state.
As over 2,000 miles of coast have been eaten away over the last 80 or so years, the state and federal government, oil and gas companies, activists and residents battled and bickered over funding the future of the state’s coast. So far, little has been accomplished.
John Barry, an author cum activist, hopes to change that.
Last July, Barry — then a member of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority–East (SLFPA-e), a small Louisiana agency that oversees flood protection systems around New Orleans — helped lead the authority in filing suit against nearly 100 oil and gas companies. He and his cohort alleged that the companies, which ranged from state-based pipeline service providers to subsidiaries of multinational corporations like ExxonMobil, were responsible for decades of degradation to Louisiana’s coast. They said through exploration, canal dredging and drilling, the companies destroyed much of the state’s coast. And they claimed that as the governmental body tasked with overseeing flood protection for the New Orleans area, they had a responsibility to restore that coast in order to better prevent Louisiana’s low-lying areas from being inundated during storms.

Read more

aljazeeraamerica:

In Louisiana, an environmental lawsuit brings hope for a new chapter

Louisiana is being slowly devoured by water. Hardly anyone disputes that. But beyond a shared sense of creeping panic, there’s little common ground in the state.

As over 2,000 miles of coast have been eaten away over the last 80 or so years, the state and federal government, oil and gas companies, activists and residents battled and bickered over funding the future of the state’s coast. So far, little has been accomplished.

John Barry, an author cum activist, hopes to change that.

Last July, Barry — then a member of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority–East (SLFPA-e), a small Louisiana agency that oversees flood protection systems around New Orleans — helped lead the authority in filing suit against nearly 100 oil and gas companies. He and his cohort alleged that the companies, which ranged from state-based pipeline service providers to subsidiaries of multinational corporations like ExxonMobil, were responsible for decades of degradation to Louisiana’s coast. They said through exploration, canal dredging and drilling, the companies destroyed much of the state’s coast. And they claimed that as the governmental body tasked with overseeing flood protection for the New Orleans area, they had a responsibility to restore that coast in order to better prevent Louisiana’s low-lying areas from being inundated during storms.

Read more